• The DigitalBank Vault

Beware of 'Coronavirus Maps' – It's a malware infecting PCs to steal passwords


https://www.digitalbankvault.com/



Cybercriminals will stop at nothing to exploit every chance to prey on internet users.

Even the disastrous spread of SARS-COV-II (the virus), which causes COVID-19 (the disease), is becoming an opportunity for them to likewise spread malware or launch cyber attacks.


Reason Cybersecurity recently released a threat analysis report detailing a new attack that takes advantage of internet users' increased craving for information about the novel coronavirus that is wreaking havoc worldwide.


The malware campaign specifically aims to target those who are looking on the Internet for cartographic presentations of the spread of COVID-19 and serving them with a malicious application that, on its front-end, shows a map loaded from a legit online source but in the background compromises the computer.


New Threat With An Old Malware Component


The latest threat, designed to steal information from unwitting victims, was first spotted by MalwareHunterTeam last week and has now been analyzed by Shai Alfasi, a cybersecurity researcher at Reason Labs.


It involves a malware identified as AZORult, an information-stealing malicious software discovered in 2016. AZORult malware collects information stored in web browsers, particularly cookies, browsing histories, user IDs, passwords, and even cryptocurrency keys.


With these data drawn from browsers, it is possible for cybercriminals to steal credit card numbers, login credentials, and various other sensitive information.

AZORult is reportedly discussed in Russian underground forums as a tool for gathering sensitive data from computers. It comes with a variant that is capable of generating a hidden administrator account in infected computers to enable connections via the remote desktop protocol (RDP).


Sample Analysis


Alfasi provides technical details upon studying the malware, which is embedded in the file, usually named as Corona-virus-Map.com.exe. It's a small Win32 EXE file with a payload size of only around 3.26 MB.


Double-clicking the file opens a window that shows various information about the spread of COVID-19. The centerpiece is a "map of infections" similar to the one hosted by Johns Hopkins University, a legitimate online source to visualize and track reported coronavirus cases in real-time.


Numbers of confirmed cases in different countries are presented on the left side while stats on deaths and recoveries are on the right. The window appears to be interactive, with tabs for various other related information and links to sources.

It presents a convincing GUI not many would suspect to be harmful. The information presented is not an amalgamation of random data, instead, it is actual COVID-19 information pooled from the Johns Hopkins website.


To be noted, the original coronavirus map hosted online by Johns Hopkins University or ArcGIS is not infected or backdoored in any way and are safe to visit.

The malicious software utilizes some layers of packing along with a multi-sub-process technique infused to make it challenging for researchers to detect and analyze. Additionally, it employs a task scheduler so it can continue operating.


Signs of Infection


Executing the Corona-virus-Map.com.exe results in the creation of duplicates of the Corona-virus-Map.com.exe file and multiple Corona.exe, Bin.exe, Build.exe, and Windows.Globalization.Fontgroups.exe file


Additionally, the malware modifies a handful of registers under ZoneMap and LanguageList. Several mutexes are also created.


Execution of the malware activates the following processes: Bin.exe, Windows.Globalization.Fontgroups.exe, and Corona-virus-Map.com.exe. These attempt to connect to several URLs.


These processes and URLs are only a sample of what the attack entails. There are many other files generated and processes initiated. They create various network communication activities as malware tries to gather different kinds of information.


Alfasi observed a static loading of APIs associated with nss3.dll. These APIs appeared to facilitate the decryption of saved passwords as well as the generation of output data. This is a common approach used by data thieves. Relatively simple, it only captures the login data from the infected web browser and moves it to the C:\Windows\Temp folder. It's one of the hallmarks of an AZORult attack, wherein the malware extracts data, generates a unique ID of the infected computer, applies XOR encryption, then initiates C2 communication. The malware makes specific calls in an attempt to steal login data from common online accounts such as Telegram and Steam. To emphasize, malware execution is the only step needed for it to proceed with its information-stealing processes. Victims don't need to interact with the window or input sensitive information therein.


DigitalBank Vault® provides sophisticated Digital Anti Surveillance technologies: military-grade encryption devices for ultra-secure anonymous communication (voice calls & text messaging) with untraceable file transfers & storage solutions
3 views
Download The Introduction to the
DigitalBank Vault Encryption Systems 

DigitalBank Vault Limited

Irish Square, Upper Denbigh Road, 

St Asaph Denbighshire LL17 0RN, UK

Company number 11988551

(Limited Liability Registered in England & Wales)

International Calls & Whatsapp  : +372 57347873

 

Contact Email : team@digitalbank.capital  

Telegram : @timothyweiss 

LinkedIn:  http://linkedin.com/in/moty-weissbrot-42bb06162